Archive for the 'Immigration' Category

Quote Of The Day

“The same Times article observes that even without the workplace raids, deportations have reached new heights for two years running at the direction of President Barack Obama — revealing (as if we didn’t already know) that virulent xenophobia is alive and well in the Democratic party too. This is, after all, the same Barack Obama who said in his acceptance speech at the 2008 convention that nobody benefits when an employer undercuts American wages by hiring illegal workers. Well, sure. Nobody, that is, except the employer, his customers, and the illegal workers who, in Barack Obama’s universe, count as “nobody”.” — Steve Landsburg, professor of economics at the University of Rochester who blogs at The Big Questions

Quote Of The Day

“One of America’s sources of long-term strength is its ability to assimilate foreign talent, argues former Pentagon planning official Thomas Mahnken in the new issue of Saisphere, an obscure in-house publication of the international affairs school at the Johns Hopkins University. “Such immigration could prove to be an enduring source of U.S. strategic advantage,” he writes. “How effective the United States proves in assimilating these new immigrants into the life of the nation will play a major role in determining its strategic effectiveness. The United States’ historical ability to assimilate has given it a distinct advantage over most other nations, which display little willingness to incorporate immigrants into the mainstream of their societies.”” — Thomas E Ricks, blogging at Foreign Policy

My Tentative View Of The Dream Act

A couple of people have asked me privately what I think about the Dream Act so I thought I would post it here as well. This has been my general reply to the question:

“There is a trade off (inverse relationship) between welfare and immigration. The more welfare, the less people are supportive of immigration. The more immigration, the less people are supportive of welfare. And the inverse relationship is especially strong when it’s immigrants themselves getting welfare. The more people perceive of immigrants coming for welfare checks, for example, the less they will be tolerant of more immigrants.

So by default, because I want more immigrants in the United States, I am generally against any welfare that seems to benefit immigrants. But the Dream Act is tricky. It’s not exactly welfare. It’s more like “level playing field” type welfare. Without it, you create this poor underclass with no real hope to get ahead. So I am torn. That makes me want to support it.

In the end, I don’t know which way I would ultimately vote on the legislation. I probably would vote for it, but very reluctantly. Instead, I wish this was more of a private charity kind of thing. Create a private charity that pays for immigrants education, for example. Forcing others to pay via taxes is only going to create backlash – and ultimately, harm other immigrants wishing to come to the United States.

Quote Of The Day

“Despite criticisms from Republican politicians about the White House’s overly lenient immigration policies, this administration is actually deporting more immigrants than the Bush administration.” — Catherine Rampell, writing in the New York Times economix section

Two Arguments In Favor Of Immigration